Play: The New Capitalist Tool

I almost dropped my iPhone this morning.  There, on the 2.31- by 4.87-inch screen, was “Why Playful Learning Is The Key to Prosperity.”  Yes, in the “Entrepreneurs” section of Forbes.  By 8:50 a.m., the piece, written by John Converse Townsend, the media manager of Ashoka—“we write about change in the making—“had garnered 9,276 views.

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After an exuberant jig on my living-room rug, I got down to business, and ingested the message right upfront, in the lead paragraph:

In order for our global society to develop solutions to pressing problems in an increasingly technology-driven and constantly changing world, we need to re-train our workforce to do what machines can’t: to be enterprising, independent and strategic thinkers—to be purposeful creators.

Townsend sums up the evidence, citing a classic study published in Developmental Psychology in 1973, in which preschoolers were divided into three groups: one was allowed to play freely with four common objects; a second was asked to imitate an adult using the four objects; and the last group was left to sit at a table and draw. Immediately after the kids had finished, the researchers plied them for ideas about how one of the objects could be used.  The results? The children who played freely generated, on average, three times as many “nonstandard, creative uses for the objects” than those who were more constricted.

I guess he’d missed Play=Learning, a more recent, 21st-century, collection of scientific wisdom compiled by Dorothy Singer, Roberta Golinkoff, and Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, which takes us straight into the wild weeds of child development and education policy.  But no matter.

Townsend then homes in on “hands-on, minds-on” approaches, not workbooks, a phrase hyperlinked to “Unleashing Empathy: How Teachers Transform Classrooms with Emotional Learning. ” Written by the aptly named Lennon Flowers, in a magazine called Yes!, the article was recently published by the Positive Futures Network, on Bainbridge Island, in Washington.  I don’t know about you, but  I’m ready to head out on the next ferry to meet these nurturers of creativity.  Who, I’m sure, have checked out the Nordic countries—especially Finland, of the stellar PISA scores.  As their National Curriculum Guidelines point out, “children use everything they see, hear, and experience as elements in their play.  When they play, they imitate and create new things.”

Workbooks and rote learning just don’t cut it. Filling in the bubbles and the lines is not the secret to self-awareness, cooperation, and other kinds of social-emotional skills that foster learning.   And the loss of play for America’s poor children—now one in four, putting us second only to Romania in rankings of child poverty—is devastating.  They’re exposed to levels of stress that Jack Shonkoff of Harvard has likened to “having an adrenaline rush 24/7.” It’s hard to be innovative when you’re anxious, emotionally volatile, and your brain’s on auto-pilot.

 

Here’s Townsend’s call to action:

If we want a better, smarter planet, we need to change the way the next generation children are taught.  Allowing more students to grow up without those prosocial, exploratory skills, leaving them unable to reach their potential, would be criminal.

Play can deliver.

What are we waiting for?

Forbes is on a mission.  Earlier this year, “The Capitalist Tool” suggested that we might be “educating our kids out of creativity.”   How’s that for an education policy critique?  I’m next to them, on the pillow—a strange bedfellow, to be sure.  An unholy alliance, I once would have called it.  But I could get used to this marriage of convenience.

Caption: A still photograph from Spirit Ship, a short film by Kristin B. Eno, which showcases the original stories children make up as they go along their journeys, both real and imagined.


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Test Talk: Not a Pretty Picture, Lucy Calkins

Patrick Wall, over at Chalkbeat, formerly Gotham Schools, just weighed in on the testing situation in New York.  Not a pretty picture, he concluded, based on an online critique by teachers in a new site dedicated to “Testing Talk.” The English Language Arts exam—now a devoted Common Core handmaiden—had just graduated to the level of “soul-crushing.”

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Wall observed that the educators who migrated to the online forum ”represent a tiny fraction of the state’s educators.”  Of course, most teachers are too busy prepping their students to register protest online.  No matter.  He dutifully recorded the comments of a sampling of educators, with an emphasis on the grades beyond three, the border of early childhood.

He did mention a third-grade teacher, who noted that students faced “obscure vocabulary and unapproachable plot line,” excerpted from a mid-20th century text.  A good number of teachers pronounced the tests “especially arduous for English-language learners and students with special needs”—a veritable “endurance test,” in fact.  And others took issue with the pace, that sense of “racing against the clock to finish.”

By the time Wall had gotten around to posting, “Testing Talk” had attracted 150,000 hits and 300 comments, a tally he got from Lucy Calkins, the founding director of the Teachers College Reading and Writing Project, and the site’s creator.  The purpose, she maintains, is to hold test-makers accountable to test-takers.   “There have been billions of dollars and millions of hours of children’s and teachers’ lives that have been invested in these new tests,” she said.  “My goal is to help educators be part of the process of making better tests.”

Better tests.  Ah, there’s the rub.  And what about Pearson, the test-maker, and their five-year $32-million contract with New York State?

Wall gives just a nod to the mounting concerns among parents of children in the early grades: kindergarten through third grade.  At the end of his piece, he tosses in a mention of a protest at Brooklyn’s P.S. 321, a K-5 school in the heart of progressive Park Slope.

Where has he been? The opt-out movement has been rapidly gathering steam in the earlier end of the education spectrum, as I observed not long ago at Huffington Post, followed by the New Yorker’s Rebecca Mead, whose son is a third-grader at the Brooklyn New School.

Wall also neglected to mention the parents in New Jersey, who just introduced to the state assembly a bill ( A3079) to ban standardized tests prior to third grade .  Here’s the summary, straight from what we hope will be statute:

This bill provides that a school district may not administer a commercially-developed standardized assessment to students enrolled in kindergarten through the second grade. The bill would not preclude a classroom teacher or a board of education from developing, administering, and scoring an assessment in kindergarten through the second grade.

I’d include third grade in that ban–and beyond.  But it’s a good start.  Take that, Pearson, and Lucy Calkins.


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Rescuing the Children of Indian Country

Record-breaking cold pummeled Indian Country this winter. Temperatures in South Dakota, where less than a third of Native American students manage to complete high school, plunged into the negative digits. Survival kits entered the daily routine.

Meanwhile, back in Washington, in late February, a Senate committee hosted a hearing on “Early Childhood Development and Education in [... click post title to read more ...]


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